GMAT Sentence Completion Questions

The GMAT, or Graduate Management Admission Test, is one test you will have to take-not to mention all the test preparation you’ll have to do-if you plan on furthering your academic career in the business or management fields. The standardized test is used by almost two thousand graduate schools around the world, making it a necessity for those who plan on getting a masters in business administration, or in any other similar area. The test is a general exploration of the test-taker’s business knowledge, skills and experience, and subjective things like motivation and interpersonal skills. Beyond these things, the GMAT measures things that are very simple and that can be adequately prepare for with an online test prep, like your basic verbal, mathematical and analytical skills.

Regardless of why you’re taking the GMAT, you will probably want to spend at least a month on test preparation to ensure that you get a good score. This is especially true since the cost for taking the test is two hundred and fifty dollars. That’s quite a bit of money, so you’ll want to make sure you’re well prepared. Fortunately, there are plenty of great online test prep websites like B Line Test Prep that will help you to make a great score, regardless of what you think your weak areas are.

One area of the GMAT where people often have trouble is the sentence completion part of the test. These questions aim to measure your knowledge of key grammatical points. Subjects covered may include the passive voice, mismatched subject/object pairs, incorrect verb tenses, and so on. Sentence Completion questions are a part of the verbal section of the quiz, and there are usually between sixteen and eighteen of them. Since the verbal section is only about forty questions, that makes this a very important part of the test that you’ll want to focus on in your online test prep studies or in whatever other test preparation method that you use.

The GMAT’s structure gives you four hours to complete the entire test, with two timed breaks of ten minutes each to give you a bit of a breather. This means that you have a little over three and a half hours for the test, or an hour and ten minutes for each of its three sections. Since the sentence completion part is about half of the exam’s verbal section, you’ll probably be using up somewhere between thirty and forty-five minutes completing and correcting sentences.

An Example Question:

The idea on the GMAT sentence completion questions is taking the sentence given to you and replace part of it with one of the choices listed below.

A) to take the sentence given to you and replace

B) taking the sentence given to you and replacing

C) take the sentence you were given and to replace

D) to taking a number of sentences you are given and replace

E) No change is required

Choice E is a popular one, and makes this section especially tricky, since not all sentences are actually incorrect.

Key statistics for the GMAT sentence completion:

* 16-18 questions in the verbal
* Verbal section consists of roughly 41 questions
* Aim to spend somewhere between half an hour and forty-five minutes on this portion of the test

Remember, sufficient test preparation is vital for success in this and other portions of the GMAT. Fortunately, there are great online test prep sites like B Line Test Prep to help you through your study period.

Like gas stations in rural Texas after 10 pm, comments are closed.


© 2009 - 2017 B Line Test Prep | All Rights Reserved

Disclaimer: The SAT is a registered trademark of the College Board. Neither the College Board or the Graduate Admission Council is not affiliated and does not endorse this website. All marks are the property of their respective owners.