Learning a Second Language in School

Learning a Second Language

Learning a second language is often a process that takes an investment of a significant amount of time and energy, as students focus on learning the complicated nuances of another tongue. For high school students, this investment may seem to be a waste of time or an unnecessary complication to be juggled with an assortment of other challenging subjects demanding one’s attention. In fact, learning a second language before pursuing post-secondary studies often gives students an edge over their peers, while also improving job prospects in the future. Furthermore, the personal growth and enlarged perspective such learning opportunities provide allow students to become better rounded individuals, benefits of which can be demonstrated in several different areas of life.

For students who have already determined that post-secondary studies at an accredited college or university are the right path for them, foreign language knowledge is often a graduation requirement. The vast majority of these academic institutions require at least two years of foreign language study, whereas some schools may require as much as four years of study. Meeting these requirements before graduation from high school means students will not need to take language courses while pursuing an advanced degree. This leaves students with more time to focus on the core curriculum for their chosen degree path, while also eliminating an additional obstacle towards obtaining one’s diploma.

In addition to the many benefits that foreign language study can present in the field of continued education, students who have mastered another language often secure better positions within their chosen industry following graduation. An increasingly competitive job market that has been dramatically impacted by the effects of globalization means job candidates with strong foreign language abilities are in great demand across a wide assortment of different industries. Individuals who can demonstrate proficiency in a particular language have a myriad of options open to them, some of which may come with higher salaries.

Another reason language learning should be encouraged in the high school setting is for the many advantages young language learners have over those who attempt to master a second language later in life. Linguistic experts have confirmed that individuals given the opportunity to become familiar with a second language at a young age demonstrate higher levels of proficiency and greater comprehension than their counterparts who began studying the language after their formative years. While high schoolers have already missed the crucial period during which their brains formed an understanding of how language works, they nevertheless have a unique advantage over adults who long ago closed the chapter on learning the ins and outs of verbal and written communication.

As students continue along the path of language learning, many are surprised to discover the desire to see another country or experience life in another part of the world. Some of these students opt to spend vacations traveling through foreign lands, while others may instead live abroad for a period of time. Not only can students benefit from being immersed in a culture where the foreign tongue is the dominant form of communication, but the perspective and world view many are left with starkly rivals those of individuals who have never seen how other parts of the world function. This perspective can be an invaluable resource for those hoping to work in an environment that places an emphasis on reaching customers dotted throughout the globe.

While the different benefits of learning a language could be extolled for days, ultimately language learning also proves to be an overwhelmingly fun experience for the majority of students who choose to embark on this adventure. Learning to express oneself through foreign words and embracing concepts that may be different to those accepted within one’s native culture forces individuals to reflect upon their own personal identities and how they have been shaped by the world around them. For many language learners, this phenomenon is a cathartic experience that allows one to obtain a more nuanced grasp on human societies in general, in addition to a greater appreciation for the academic process.

 

Be Your Best for the SAT

It can be tough not to become overly stressed about an upcoming SAT exam. Many students find themselves feeling overwhelmed as their test day approaches. But these pressures are often self inflicted and self defeating. To reduce this stress, it is helpful to place the SAT exams in perspective. While the score is an import aspect of the college admissions process, it is not the only factor.
College admissions administrators consider other aspects of an application as well, including letters of recommendation, academic grades, extracurricular activities and admissions essays. Also, students can retake the test as many times as they like. Many individuals find themselves choosing to retake the SAT because of a low score. And it is true that a high score can only be a positive for a student’s record.

While it is understandable that the last thing a student is thinking about on test day is eating, being on one’s best means preparing physically as well as mentally. A part of this physical preparation involves eating a healthy meal before taking the test.

It is wise to avoid junk foods that can give provide short-term boost of energy. They often leave a student feeling tired and drained mid-way through an examination. Complex carbohydrates, such as those found in bread or potatoes, are a better bet. These foods will provide energy that lasts longer than candy or other sugary snacks.

Staying motivated and energized leading up to the test is crucial to success. A little exercise, such as taking a brisk walk or playing basketball, can help to calm the nerves and enforce mental alertness. Exercise is known to help reduce stress under a variety of different circumstances. Of course, the student should not have too much of a good thing. Excessive exercise can lead to physical exhaustion or simply being too tired to fully concentrate on the questions asked on the SAT exam.

Students about to take the SAT should also keep in mind the difference between effective, diligent studying and over-studying to the point that the information learned becomes garbled. The student studying for the SAT should learn what is needed for the exam and nothing more. Learning to approach studying in a focused way that still leaves time for relaxation is key to retaining information and using it during the exam.


SAT prep

 

begins with organizing the various resources and materials required for the subject matter presented on the test. One way for a student to improve his/her chances of doing well on the SAT examination is to ask instructors to help in developing a list of resources and supplemental materials that can be used while tutoring for the different sections of the SAT.

Studying with friends or family members can make studying not only a more pleasant experience, but also a more productive and effective one. For example, creating or purchasing flash cards on the SAT prep topics which friends read out could be an excellent way to retain information that is being studied. It can also be useful for several students at the same school to form their own SAT study club so they can prepare as a group. Other students are also more likely to find the time to help if they are preparing for the exam too.

There are numerous free SAT online resources available for those doing SAT prep. B Line Test Prep’s free SAT online resources offer practice tests that will offer feedback on a test taker’s performance. When taking these tests, it is vital to carefully examine the resulting scores to see where the weak areas are so they can be addressed during future studying.

Some high schools, community centers and community colleges offer assistance to those wanting to study for the SAT.

 

Top Five SAT Writing Tips

Sat Writing Tips

Many students preparing for the SAT feel lost when they begin to study for the writing portion of the exam. Most SAT prep programs and books try to cover this section, but it is by far the most difficult to study for. The following five tips should help you prepare:

1. Don’t panic. If you allow yourself to become too anxious, your thoughts will get frantic and your essay score will suffer. Taking the time for SAT prepwell before your exam date will make you feel more confident and less nervous at exam time.2. Know how to structure an essay. Graders want to make sure you know how an essay is structured, so write four to five well-organized paragraphs with both an introduction and a conclusion.3. Show off what you know. Using more advanced words properly will help your score, as will citing examples from your knowledge of history or literature to strengthen your argument.4. Be tidy and organized. You don’t want your poor handwriting, punctuation, or paragraph separation to distract your reader and grader from what you’ve actually said. Write in print instead of cursive and be sure to leave an indentation before a new paragraph.

5. Use all the time and space you are given. Take your time and don’t rush. Your essay will benefit from extra time for outlining and editing. Also, research shows that SAT essay graders consistently give longer essays higher scores, so try to use every line on the page.

Master the SAT Setup…Master the SAT

Sat Setup

The SAT is more than 100 years old and has been studied to the point that it’s become almost a science. It’s also perhaps the most important exam a high school student will take, having far-reaching impact on one’s life. It would be unwise to not fully prepare for something so important, and even basic understanding and casual knowledge from free SAT prep can have a big impact on test scores. The SAT is split into three sections: critical reading, mathematics and writing.

Critical Reading
Split into three sections: two 25-minute and one 20-minute, with questions about reading packages and sentence completions. In there are a total 19 sentence completion questions and 40 reading comprehension questions. What some aren’t aware of us the fact that question sets tend to become more difficult as the test progresses, therefore be sure to allot time to later questions. While reading the sections, don’t worry about memorizing details and focus on the first and last sentence of a paragraph. As a rule, skip questions you deem difficult and come back to them later; leaving a question you aren’t sure of blank isn’t as bad as not having a chance on questions you might have gotten.

Mathematics
The math required for the exam isn’t so advanced, but it must be done quickly and with clear thinking. The time frame, two 25-minute sections and one 20-minute, is the biggest problem for most students. Working efficiently is key: answer easy questions first and come back to hard ones. Easy questions usually precede hard ones. Practice will help with working efficiently – the test doesn’t repeat questions from exam to exam, but you will recognize the types of questions asked. Over time you will improve at those types.

Writing
The essay is quite standard, but basics can be forgotten when writing a rushed essay. Throwing in some big words is said to really help. Write neatly and use as much space as you can without going over. It’s a fine line, but don’t ramble as well – you won’t get another sheet of paper. Basic essay structure applies: introduction, body paragraphs, and a conclusion. Don’t waste time worrying about whether your examples are perfect, but do be sure your examples support your thesis.

 

Breaking Down the SAT: Sentence Completion

Sat Sentence Completion

The sentence completion portion of the SAT is designed to test your vocabulary and reading comprehension through the use of contextual clues. The section will provide you with a series of incomplete sentences where the test taker is responsible for filling in the missing word or words from the choices provided. A multiple choice consisting of five potential answers will be supplied for each question.

Approximately one-fourth of the critical reading section of the SAT is comprised of sentence completion questions. Furthermore, each of these questions must be answered within the span of a minute in order to allow for enough time to complete the test. As a result, it is vital that students familiarize themselves with the format so they can answer as quickly and competently as possibly.One strategy for answering these types of questions is to fill in your own words to complete the sentence. This allows your mind to quickly understand the context of the sentence and the type of word that would be appropriate. Once you have selected your own word, you can also answer the question simply by locating the proper synonym. If there are multiple answers that seem synonymous with the word you chose, read the sentence with both words and confirm which makes more sense. Another tactic is to pay close attention to specific words or phrases that alter the context, such as “however” and “in addition.” These words serve as clues to whether the word contrasts or complements the preceding statement. For instance, the following is an example of a common type of sentence completion question taken from B Line Test Prep’s free SAT online course:Although H.P. Lovecraft wrote many of the world’s most influential horror stories, during his lifetime he was ____.A) famous
B) unrivaled
C) obscure
D) renowned
E) masterfulExamining this sentence, we can see that there is a clue at the very beginning. The word “although” indicates there will be a contrast or unexpected outcome at the end of the sentence. As the first portion of the sentence lauds Lovecraft as an influential writer, we can surmise that during his lifetime he was anything but. Using the stratagem listed above, we can fill in the blank with the words “not influential” or “not very good.” Shuffling through the potential answers, all seem to imply the opposite save for C) obscure.

Like most sections of the SAT, the sentence completion section is ordered from the least to most difficult question. Therefore it is imperative you move quickly through the early portions in order to allow for enough time to complete the test. You can take advantage of an SAT prep to further acclimate yourself to the questions and time constraints in order to better prepare you for the actual exam.

How to Succeed on the SAT

How to succeed on the sat

The SAT, also known as the Scholastic Aptitude Test, is one of the primary requirements for students looking to get into college. If you are a student who is invested in furthering their scholastic career or you are a parent who has a college-bound child, SAT prep is going to be an integral part of the college application process. The test consists of three sections, including critical reading, math and writing, and the test itself takes three hours and forty-five minutes to complete. While it is acceptable to take the test several times, it is an endurance trial, and ideally a student should only take it once.

When you are looking for SAT prep options, classes immediately become one of the first options on the table. However, the truth of the matter is that classes are not absolutely required; as a matter of fact, free SAT prep resources can keep the student grounded and in control of the situation. For example, one of the best ways to prepare for the SAT is to take sample tests. Sample tests not only give you an idea of what to expect, you’ll also find that they teach the student to pace him or herself. One of the major criticisms of this type of testing is that it penalizes students who do not operate well under pressure, and taking practice tests helps you eliminate that.

One thing that someone taking the Scholastic Aptitude Test should be aware of is that it rewards people who react well to testing in general. If you are a student who has a knack for understanding the way testing works, this test will be comparably easier for you than it is for someone who tests poorly. However, even students who test poorly can get a good score if they drill in the time frame that is given to them. Practice doing timed versions of practice tests; use B Line Test Prep’s free SAT online course so that you can do them in a timely fashion.

Another way to ensure that you succeed is by understanding a few basic pieces of information regarding the test. While each of the three sections are weighted equally, the math section is considered easier than the writing or reading sections. Consider your own strengths as a student and think about where you need to do work. If you are strong in math but weaker in writing communication, use this information to focus your studies.

When you are looking at cramming for the Scholastic Aptitude Test, remember that you should always focus on vocabulary. The written section is extremely focused on words and word choice, and one way to study for the test is to memorize the word lists that are available. However, more important than learning the words by heart, is being able to use them. Students demonstrate their mastery over the words by using them correctly. Instead of just memorizing the word meanings, you’ll find that it is very easy to simply remember the words by memorizing them as they appear in sentences. This not only cements the meaning but allows you to figure out what the word means from context.

Also consider what your test taking mode of operation is going to be. For example, one way to take the test is to go through and answer all the questions that you are relatively sure about first. This allows you to get all the way through the test. One problem that many test takers have is that they do a few questions and then they get bogged down. This can be disastrous if the slowing down happens early in the test. Instead, get through all the easier questions and then go back and answer the more difficult ones, taking your time.

Finally, when you are considering preparing for this test, remember that it is not the only one that you can take. The ACT is set up differently and most colleges that accept one will accept the other. Consider what your strengths are and which test plays to them.

Taking the Scholastic Aptitude Test can be quite daunting, but remember that you can do well with the right preparation.

 

How to Solve SAT Passage-Based Reading Questions

Sat Passage Based Reading Questions

Students can use these tips for how to solve SAT passage-based reading questions to ensure that they do the best on this exam. This test is an essential component of the college admissions process, and students should try to score their very best. There are a variety of studying options that are available for students, and there are several free SAT prep courses that provide the techniques that are essential to success. The SAT includes two parts of critical reading: the passage based reading questions and solving sentence completion questions.
The passage based reading questions include short passages that are in the range of 100 to 900 words and the subjects that are covered in these sections are variable. They are designed to test a student’s ability to comprehend the passage they read and are not intended to test for knowledge, which should already be known. Students may also encounter two passages, which deal with the same topic, and they are asked to contrast the ideas that are discussed in the particular sections.

Experts have recommended a number of tips for students to approach this test, and most people improve their scores when they rely on the following free SAT prep tips.

Reading the questions first is one of the tips that most experts recommend. This will provide students with an overview of the information that they are supposed to be find in the passage. Students may think this is a waste of time, but it is really a time saving strategy. This test is timed, and takers should take advantage of the techniques that will enable them to have plenty of time to finish all of the questions without getting stressed. Reading the questions first enables students to look for particular things while they are reading, and this makes answering the questions much easier.

B Line Test Prep’s SAT prep tip #2 that is recommended by experts is to label the particular questions that are encountered. Questions are generally referred to as general or specific, and these can easily be marked with a G or an S. Students can enter this information next to the questions about a particular text, and most of the SAT prep experts recommend that the specific questions are answered first. This provides more information and will make the general questions easier to answer.

Highlighting the text as it is read enables takers to quickly refer to relevant passages. When students read the questions first, they can also highlight the sections that will relate to particular questions. The test administrators encourage students to make as many marks as they want in the booklet, and this is a great way to keep track of difficult questions. The main points of the entire passage can be underlined or circled, and then this information can be used to answer the questions.

Answering the questions with the answers hidden also enables students to be sure that they have the correct answer. This may seem foolish at first, but many of the questions include answers that are meant to distract the participants from the real answer. If a person has a good idea of what the correct answer is, they can then find the correct answer from the list. Test takers are assured that if they follow this tip, they will not be distracted by some of the answers that are clearly wrong. This is a time saving technique, and most people find this to be a valuable way to approach the SAT.

Doubting an answer is another waste of time, and the first answer that is marked is usually the correct one. It can be frustrating and time consuming for a person to double check their answers and doubt them. This is unproductive, and many people lose a lot of their precious time when they try to scrutinize the answers that have already been given. This is a timed test, and students should be sure that they have ample time to finish the entire section. Questions that seem doubtful can be marked, and at the end of a section they can be double checked. This provides students the time they need to finish the test, and it also gives them time at the end to ensure the accuracy of their answers without the stress.

 

Back to School Tips for High Schoolers

Back to school is a time of mixed feelings for most high school students. Summer is coming to an end, a new school year is just beginning, and, for most students, everything about their schedule is changing. For students preparing to take the SAT this year, back to school can seem even more overwhelming than usual.

Taking the SAT is an exciting time and as students prepare for the test and look at their options for college, it is often easy to be excited about back to school. For other students, all the anticipation of planning for life after high school can be stressful. Talking with friends and family members about this can help relieve stress and help students to feel prepared and excited for all of the changes in store.

Preparing for the SAT doesn’t have to be a stressful thing. When you have the right SAT course, preparation can seem like the easy part of back to school. Finding an SAT tutor that is a good fit for your study habits can be an essential part of SAT preparation. The right tutor will be conscious of your trouble areas, study habits, and motivations. An SAT tutor can give students the added push when combined with a good SAT course.

An online SAT prep course will help students schedule their test prep around their busy academic schedules and allow them the flexibility to make their own schedule for test prep as the school year gets underway. An SAT course can often be viewed as a comprehensive SAT preparation program, or it can be paired with a tutoring schedule to enhance the study program. One of the most important elements of test prep will be taking practice tests and getting familiar with the breakdown of the SAT. Feeling in control and well informed about the test will help calm students’ nerves and allow them to enter test day feeling prepared.

For most students, the biggest challenge of back to school will be getting back in control of their schedule. After the summer, being back into the classroom can be challenging. Staying organized and setting aside blocks of time for homework, SAT preparation, extracurricular activities, and social activities can help students get their schedules back under control. Putting together a schedule can help students get everything in order and feel like they are well prepared for a new school year to begin.

SAT Prep – Then and Now

As the next generation of this country’s youth stand poised, preparing to leap forward into adulthood and the world, they are leaping into a far different world than the one many of their parents braved. Communication happens in an instant, any place in the world is but a few mouse-clicks away, prices for even the most basic of needs are rising on a global scale, and the job market is more competitive and ruthless than it has ever been. Even with all these changes, there is still three little letters that can cause the most confident of students to worry: SAT.

With college admissions being as competitive as ever and the job market still suffering in many places, a college education is as important as ever. One of the most daunting hurdles between many students and their future college careers is the Scholastic Aptitude Test, or SAT. One test and the number it provides is the difference, for many students, between acceptance and rejection when it comes to college applications.

Fortunately, in all the changes the digital age has brought into the world, there have been some major advances in SAT prep courses. SAT prep was once an expensive affair, requiring students to set aside time for extra classes and their parents to spend hundreds, if not thousands, of dollars on books and administration fees. Even with the books and fees, many times, prep courses overflow with students. Lost in the crowd, these students sometimes miss valuable personal attention that would make the difference between average scores and excellent scores.

Now, with the Internet, it is possible for a student to get a fully customized SAT prep course built to suit their needs. Students can take learn the information and take the practice tests on a timetable that suits their lifestyle. If there are any questions or trouble areas, it is as simple as reviewing the material and practicing until they know the content. With feedback and the ability to track their progress, confidence builds in a visible and meaningful way, allowing students to walk into their SAT with the knowledge that they can, and will, do well.

Best of all, this can now be obtained for free. With such an importance placed upon higher education in the workplace and global economy, there are very few things that a person can do at absolutely no cost to increase their chances of success. With no time obligations or upfront fees, what once was a service available to those who could afford it, is now easily accessible and ready to help anyone willing to take the time and take advantage of the offerings.

How Much Time Should I Spend Preparing for the SAT?

Deciding how much time to spend preparing for the SAT is important to setting up a realistic timeline and a plan to be ready on test day. Schedule your test early and then plan backwards from test day to be sure that you will not feel rushed in preparation.

For most high school students, three months is the perfect amount of time to spend preparing for the SAT. This will give you plenty of time to review material, zero in on trouble areas, and take plenty of practice tests to check on your progress along the way. Three months will also give you time to feel comfortable with the format of the test and prepared for what you will face on SAT test day.

Students who like to feel that they have extra time and have the time to devote to test prep can always start earlier. This may help some students feel less anxious about the SAT and know that they have done all that they can to prepare. If you start earlier, you have more room to spread out your test preparation and go at a pace that works for you.

If you have taken the test before and feel that you just need to brush up on the material before trying again, one month of preparation may be okay. It all depends on what will help you to feel confident when you sit down to take the test. If you only have one month to prepare, it is important to focus in almost immediately on the areas that give you the most trouble so that you have time to work through challenging material before taking the SAT.

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