How Much Time Should I Spend Studying For The SAT?

Taking the SAT is an important step when planning to attend college. Every student has a different learning style, so the time spent studying and preparing for the SAT varies greatly. It is recommended to take the PSAT first to measure the base score and then sign up for a free online SAT prep course to increase these results.

After analyzing the scores received for the PSAT, students are encouraged to take between six to twelve weeks to prepare for the final test, even if they were satisfied with their preliminary marks. It’s important to be have a strong understanding of the test layout as well as the types of questions that will be asked.

Scores can always be improved, so students are encouraged to take a few hours each week to study for the actual SAT in order to achieve higher results when it really counts. Resources like free SAT prep courses are available in order to receive practice questions and study suggestions for the test. Users of these tools can select questions from reading, mathematics and writing sections depending on areas they need the most improvement. With the lessons offered throughout these courses, students can learn at their own pace while getting useful feedback on subject areas where they need the most improvement. Also, practice tests can be taken several times and it is recommended to do so over the weekend, in order to get adjusted to waking up early in preparation of the real test. By studying with practice questions, students can gauge their improvement over the course of a few weeks.

SAT prep can make a difference when applying for scholarships and getting into first-choice colleges and universities. By enrolling in online SAT prep courses and utilizing the tools of free SAT prep, students can significantly improve their scores and by following these steps, they will learn study skills that prove useful in furthering their education.

Why do I need to study for the SAT?

Imagine standing up in front of thousands of your peers at your college graduation, having been chosen as a speaker because you were president of the Student Engineering Club and the Association of Medical Student-Doctor Alliance, not to mention founder of the Beginner’s Salsa Club and a beloved personality on the campus talk radio show. Basking in self confidence you have been slowly acquiring for the past years since you were accepted to your number one choice school, you give your mother a wink and chuckle to yourself when you notice her crying and smiling with tears of pride. Suddenly a word comes to mind. “Approbation”. This word means, “praise” such as “The crowd welcomes the heroes with approbation.” You realize you remember when you first learned this word. It was on a SAT test prep years ago. You remember those long hours spent huddled over your grueling flashcards that still had damp spots from when you fell asleep at three in the morning on a school night and all of the high school football games you missed out on and think to yourself, “It was so worth it.”

You may think you are naturally gifted and privileged just because you took the first step and signed up to take the SAT, but to achieve true success and this above scenario takes hard work and dedication, even for the naturally gifted. The SAT is designed to test skills learned throughout your high school career so it should seem like common sense but how often are you really brushing up on the algebra 1 class you took in ninth grade or vocabulary words that you crammed in the night before the test? Preparing with a free SAT test prep gives you a chance to learn the set up of the test and familiarize yourself with the types of questions you’ll be asked. This also opens doors for all types of scholarships based on your SAT scores.
While having confidence about the SAT test will be beneficial, don’t blow off preparing. Take a free SAT prep course so you can earn the best score possible.

For more information, visit B Line Test Prep

Students Seeking Alternatives to Free SAT Prep at School

Many schools have felt the repercussions of their shrinking budgets over the past several years. Unfortunately for many students preparing for the SAT, programs in schools that used to offer free SAT prep are sometimes being cut or reduced. This means that students may need to do their homework and find free SAT test prep on their own.

B Line Test Prep is now offering free SAT prep that can help fill in these gaps left by high schools’ budget cuts. Online SAT prep is easy to fit in after school, on the weekends, and during summer vacation. When it’s free too, it becomes a no-brainer, every student preparing for the SAT can give it a try.

These days, not every student has the option of free SAT prep at school, smart students may need to do a little more outside of the school day to find the right prep course. A free online course just makes sense for students with hectic schedules and little time to devote to a regular classroom course. Plus, online SAT prep makes great financial sense, with a new free option, it’s something everyone can benefit from doing.

Some high schools are also taking proactive steps to maintain free SAT test prep in spite of cuts. B Line Test Prep is an option in this situation too and is now being used in high schools around the country. Schools are using the online course to track their students ‘process and supplement their remaining program. Schools trust B Line and know that when they are able to track their students’ progress, they are better able to target the parts of the SAT that need the most work, thus focusing their resources in the right places.

The course will help students to watch their progress and test their skills with practice tests designed to measure their progress and give students a great sense of how they’re doing in their SAT prep. Being able to see this progress will make SAT prep a lot less stressful and allow students to go into test day with a good sense of their abilities, ready to perform well on the SAT.

Helicopter Parenting

Helicopter parenting is a term that is used to describe parents who are so closely involved in their child’s life that they seem to hover around them like a helicopter. Often this is taken to the extreme when a child’s academics are at stake. While there is nothing wrong with parents taking an interest in their children’s lives, schoolwork, and activities, helicopter parents often take this interest to the extreme to the point that it becomes detrimental to the child.
SAT preparations and the college application process can be particularly trying times for helicopter parents and their children. A helicopter parent may attempt to oversee their child’s SAT test prep and college applications, pushing them to excel at all costs and on the parent’s schedule. Often, this is detrimental to the child who may feel discouraged with their parent’s expectations and stifled by the pressure.

For students, having a helicopter parent can be frustrating, especially during the years when they are faced with some of their first important adult decisions. While parents should encourage their high school student to dedicate time to SAT test prep, practice tests, and time to applying for colleges, it is important that these decisions are made with the child and not for the child. This is the time that high school students should be learning to take charge of their responsibilities and plan their own schedules.

The best thing that a parent can do for their child during SAT prep and the college application process is to prepare them for independence. This means taking an active interest while allowing them the space to step up and take responsibility. This will help them to form the skills that will allow them to function after leaving home, perform well in college, and make good decisions. Often encouraging independence means allowing your student to make decisions with your guidance, not making decisions for them.

Children of helicopter parents can easily feel lost in college and out on their own. They may feel a lack of self-sufficiency and unable to make good decisions without parental approval and involvement. Parents can prevent these things by empowering their child to learn and grow, getting comfortable with making decisions that are right for them. Taking a step back can be a critical step in your child’s success.

How much more money can I make with a college degree?

Students may not take the SAT tests seriously, but it makes practical and intelligent sense to fully understand how the SAT is linked to getting into the right college. The right college will then lead to the right degree, enabling you to set yourself apart from your peers that only earned their high school diploma.

There are a lot of different studies confirming the value of a college degree in comparison with a high school diploma. The numbers range depending on age, sex, choice of school, and choice of degree, however, educational attainment studies point to shockingly large gaps between the two groups, even when all of these factors are taken into account.

After earning a high school diploma, the available job market averages between $15,000 and $28,000 annually. While this might seem like a lot of money, the available jobs tend to be limited and involve little benefits and extended work hours. When tallying costs like housing, bills, and other expenses, many high school diploma holders find themselves working multiple jobs in order to enjoy anything close to a conventional lifestyle.
Conversely those who take college preparation seriously, tend to successfully earn their bachelor’s degree. Bachelor’s degree holders open themselves up to a much more appealing monetary bracket, ranging between $33,000 and $50,000 annually. With this level of earnings, degree holders can live a much more comfortable lifestyle in an area where they hold academic specialization. This means that not only with the undergraduate degree holder have more employment options, they usually find more personally satisfying work.

Going past bachelor’s degrees, master’s and doctoral degree holder’s step themselves up with each degree accomplishment by at least a $12,000 increase in annual income on average. Therefore, students considering SAT test prep should not only aim for an associate’s or bachelor’s degree, but also keep higher degrees in mind as they gain more experience in their field of concentration.

With these figures in mind, it becomes obvious that earning a college diploma will provide a better salary and quality of life. However, there are other benefits to earning a college degree besides monetary. The college experience offers interactions with new ideas and ways of thinking, not only from professors but other students as well. Friendships can form with roommates, campus residents, classmates, students met at activities or clubs, or even the most random encounter.

Similarly, earning a college degree offers the opportunity to network in a way that simply can’t be achieved through high school only. College campuses and alumni associations provide opportunities for internships, part time jobs, full time jobs, and so on. It isn’t uncommon to intern for a company early on in your college career, work a summer job at the same place, and then find yourself offered a starting position at the same company when graduation rolls around.

College preparation will help you to achieve the goal of a college degree, allowing you access to a better job market, higher average annual salaries, the essential college experience and the ability to network in a way that will last throughout your career. Starting with SAT test prep will get you started down the right path towards a college degree and all of the doors it can open.

Summer–A Little Studying Can Go a Long Way

Finally! School is out for the summer and you have a three months of laying around in the sun or watching television for hours each day. After the first few weeks, you will quickly learn that the monotony of leisure becomes boring, and you still have weeks of vacation left. With all of this extra time on your hands, what can you do to still have fun and make the most of your summer vacation? Why not use some of your spare time for SAT test prep?

SAT test prep in the summer?!? No, it is not that crazy of an idea. The first test in the fall happens in October, just a month after you return to classes. One month will not give you enough time to get ready, but you can use your spare time in the summer to get ready for the all important SAT test.

Trying to wait until September for your test prep means that you will have to be trying to cram with all night sessions in addition to your school homework and social activities like dances and football games. Instead of pulling a series of September all nighters, take just a few minutes each day during the summer to learn a new word or math problem. This daily form of SAT test prep will be easy and nearly effortless, especially if compared to the traditional study binge many students try.

When looking for an SAT test prep program, you might be thinking that you have to spend half of your summer inside a classroom. That might have been how your parents got ready for the test, but today, you no longer have to be tied to a test prep classroom desk, nor do you have to be tied to your computer at a set time for online tutorials. For total flexibility, you want a study program that is ready when you are. A self-paced 24 hour online SAT test prep program, such as the one at B Line Test Prep, offers you a way to both have fun through the summer and get ready to take the SAT in October without cramming.

With a self-paced program, you get to spend your study time more efficiently. Instead of a classroom where the test reviewer moves at a constant pace, whether you understand the material or not, a self-paced prep program lets you concentrate on areas where you might be struggling, but spend less time on where you are proficient. Why waste time going over material you already know? Focusing on areas of the SAT where you need work will make you feel better prepared for the test come October, or whenever you opt to take it.

Flexibility for your time and your learning styles should prompt you to choose a 24 hour online SAT test prep program to use just a few minutes each day over the boring summer months to get ready for one of the most important tests of your life – the SAT.


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