GMAT Sentence Completion Questions

The GMAT, or Graduate Management Admission Test, is one test you will have to take-not to mention all the test preparation you’ll have to do-if you plan on furthering your academic career in the business or management fields. The standardized test is used by almost two thousand graduate schools around the world, making it a necessity for those who plan on getting a masters in business administration, or in any other similar area. The test is a general exploration of the test-taker’s business knowledge, skills and experience, and subjective things like motivation and interpersonal skills. Beyond these things, the GMAT measures things that are very simple and that can be adequately prepare for with anĀ online test prep, like your basic verbal, mathematical and analytical skills.

Regardless of why you’re taking the GMAT, you will probably want to spend at least a month on test preparation to ensure that you get a good score. This is especially true since the cost for taking the test is two hundred and fifty dollars. That’s quite a bit of money, so you’ll want to make sure you’re well prepared. Fortunately, there are plenty of great online test prep websites like B Line Test Prep that will help you to make a great score, regardless of what you think your weak areas are.

One area of the GMAT where people often have trouble is the sentence completion part of the test. These questions aim to measure your knowledge of key grammatical points. Subjects covered may include the passive voice, mismatched subject/object pairs, incorrect verb tenses, and so on. Sentence Completion questions are a part of the verbal section of the quiz, and there are usually between sixteen and eighteen of them. Since the verbal section is only about forty questions, that makes this a very important part of the test that you’ll want to focus on in your online test prep studies or in whatever other test preparation method that you use.

The GMAT’s structure gives you four hours to complete the entire test, with two timed breaks of ten minutes each to give you a bit of a breather. This means that you have a little over three and a half hours for the test, or an hour and ten minutes for each of its three sections. Since the sentence completion part is about half of the exam’s verbal section, you’ll probably be using up somewhere between thirty and forty-five minutes completing and correcting sentences.

An Example Question:

The idea on the GMAT sentence completion questions is taking the sentence given to you and replace part of it with one of the choices listed below.

A) to take the sentence given to you and replace

B) taking the sentence given to you and replacing

C) take the sentence you were given and to replace

D) to taking a number of sentences you are given and replace

E) No change is required

Choice E is a popular one, and makes this section especially tricky, since not all sentences are actually incorrect.

Key statistics for the GMAT sentence completion:

* 16-18 questions in the verbal
* Verbal section consists of roughly 41 questions
* Aim to spend somewhere between half an hour and forty-five minutes on this portion of the test

Remember, sufficient test preparation is vital for success in this and other portions of the GMAT. Fortunately, there are great online test prep sites like B Line Test Prep to help you through your study period.

GMAT Reading Comprehension Section Broken Down

The GMAT reading comprehension section of the test is comprised of around twelve to fourteen questions that are within the verbal section of the test. The time available for the verbal section of the test is seventy five minutes. There are four passages to read with three to four questions following each passage. This section of the GMAT measures the skill to precisely and thoroughly read a passage, and then be able to correctly answer questions regarding it. The ability to draw conclusions from the material while paying attention to what the actual question is asking important. Certain parts of the text might be there just to confuse the test-taker. Attention to detail is essential for scoring well on the GMAT.

There are usually three areas that the reading comprehension section focuses on. They are Science (biology, etc.), Social Sciences (history, politics), and Business. The Science section usually has the factual questions, while the Social Sciences and Business sections usually contain the more difficult inference-type questions. A student may be asked to infer an author’s mood from reading a 200-400 word passage. These passages can often be filled with obscure words to further confound the test-taker.

Some useful tips for getting the optimum score on the GMAT include preparing as much as possible for the test. A student that uses multiple study methods such as flashcards, workbooks and an online test preparation course will be much better prepared than a student who does not utilize those methods. Studying over the course of three months is definitely favorable to studying for only three weeks. During the test, the test-taker should pace them self accordingly. Jot down notes in order grasp a certain concept. If a particular question is presenting a problem, then moving on to the next question and returning back to the more difficult question later is a viable option. Spending too much time on any one question can interfere with the ability to finish the test, therefore lowering the test score considerably.

GMAT Test Taking Tips

The GMAT is a requirement for most graduate school programs, and like the SAT taken in high school, the GMAT can be a harrowing experience. Weeks of study will be for naught if the test is taken without a strategy. However, by keeping a few tips in mind, greater success and a higher score on the GMAT is possible.

Preparation is the number 1 key to ensuring your success. There are several methods for preparing for your date with the GMAT test such as books, one on one tutoring, or creating flash cards. Today more people are enrolling to take their onlineĀ  GMAT test preparation course with B Line Test Prep. The courses at B Line Schools are designed to acquaint students with the types of questions encountered on the GMAT. By taking a test preparation course with B Line Schools, one’s score can rise by critical points.

During our online test prep courses, the student is presented with tips and strategies for taking the GMAT. Some of these are common sense, and some are specific to the test. For best results, an online test preparation course should be taken just a few weeks before the test to keep the information learned fresh in one’s mind.

Some of the best test taking strategies are:

Keep an even pace. If one problem is too difficult, it will be best to skip it and continue on with the rest of the test, returning to the missed problem after the easier questions have been completed. Missing a single problem does not have as severe a penalty as spending all of the time on that one question and then skipping all of the questions after it.

Try to eliminate at least one or two choices. This strategy is taught for many different types of multiple choice tests, how to best eliminate options on the GMAT is a topic discussed in online test prep courses.

Use the scratch paper provided to work out math problems. Writing out even simple equations can put the tester in a clearer frame of mind.

More specific tips for GMAT testing are found through online test preparation courses such as B Line Test Prep. These are highly recommended for those serious about doing well on the GMAT.

GMAT Test Overview

The GMAT, or Graduate Management Admission Test, is a widely recognized tool for evaluating the aptitudes of business school applicants. The GMAT is designed to measure an applicant’s analytical writing aptitude, mathematical ability, and verbal skills. Online test prep will help you prepare, at your own pace, for the kinds of questions to expect.

The first section of the GMAT is the Analytical Writing Assessment, or AWA. Thirty minutes are given to complete each of two writing tasks. The first involves analysis of a particular issue, and the second is analysis of an argument. Online GMAT Test Preparation will help you understand what sort of issues and arguments to expect and how to prepare your answer.

The second section of the GMAT is the quantitative, or mathematical, section. Seventy-five minutes are allowed for the completion of 37 randomly-generated multiple-choice questions. Some of these questions will ask whether the right information has been supplied to answer a specific question. Others will be calculation and word problems. A quality online GMAT test preparation course will familiarize you with these two different forms of quantitative questioning.

The last section of the GMAT evaluates verbal skills, including critical reasoning, reading comprehension and sentence correction. Online GMAT test preparation will guide you through reading samples and comprehension questions, sentences and their possible errors, and how to identify assumptions and draw conclusions from a given argument.

The verbal and quantitative portions of the test feature randomly generated questions that adapt to your answers. If an easier question is successfully answered, the next one will be slightly harder. Incorrect answers are scored higher than skipped questions. Online test prep will help you get the feel for how this adaptive component of the GMAT works.

A GMAT score includes a ranking in each of the three skill areas. The total score for the verbal and quantitative sections will range from 200 to 800, with the median being about 500. This is what is usually referred to as the GMAT score. The AWA section is scored separately from the two other sections. Top business schools require GMAT scores above 700 for admission.


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